Transparent Block
Cover NOT yet available in
Join Patreon for 4K upload/download access

Your Rating (Click a star below)

Star off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off iconStar off icon




Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon off
Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon
Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon off
Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon
Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon off
Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon off
Star IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar IconStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon offStar Icon off

3:59
3:32
7:06
4:44
6:32
7:40
3:25
3:50
2:04

Data Complete
percentage bar 100%

Total Rating

Star Icon (12 users)

Back Cover
Album Back Cover

CD ArtEdit Icon
CDart Artwork

3D FlatEdit Icon
Album 3D Flat

3D FaceEdit Icon
Album 3D Face

3D CaseEdit Icon
Album 3D Case

3D ThumbEdit Icon Search Icon
None Found, Upload?

Spine CoverEdit Icon
Album Spine

First Released

Calendar Icon 1973

Genre

Genre Icon Progressive Rock

Mood

Mood Icon Dreamy

Style

Style Icon Rock/Pop

Theme

Theme Icon ---

Tempo

Speed Icon Medium

Release Format

Release Format Icon Album

Record Label Release

Speed Icon

World Sales Figure

Sales Icon 50,000,000 copies

Album Description
Available in: Country Icon Country Icon Country Icon Country Icon Country Icon Country Icon
The Dark Side of the Moon (en español: El lado oscuro de la luna) es un álbum conceptual y el octavo de estudio de la banda británica de rock progresivo Pink Floyd. Fue lanzado el 1 de marzo de 1973 en Estados Unidos y el 24 de marzo del mismo año en el Reino Unido.

El álbum está construido a partir de las ideas que Pink Floyd había explorado en sus conciertos y anteriores grabaciones, pero carece de los largos instrumentales que caracterizaban a los trabajos posteriores a la marcha en 1968 de su miembro fundador, principal compositor y letrista, Syd Barrett. La temática del álbum incluye el conflicto, la avaricia, el envejecimiento y la enfermedad mental, tema este último inspirado en parte por el deterioro mental de Barrett.

El álbum se desarrolló como parte de una futura gira de la banda, estrenándose en directo varios meses antes de que siquiera hubieran comenzado las grabaciones en el estudio. El nuevo material se fue refinando a medida que avanzaba la gira, y fue grabado en dos sesiones en 1972 y 1973 en los Abbey Road Studios de Londres. Pink Floyd usó algunas de las técnicas de grabación más avanzadas de la época, incluyendo grabaciones multipista y loops. En varias de las pistas se usaron sintetizadores analógicos, mientras que una serie de entrevistas con la banda y el equipo técnico aparecen a lo largo del álbum en forma de citas filosóficas. Alan Parsons fue el responsable de algunos de los aspectos sónicos más innovadores del álbum, incluyendo la interpretación no léxica de Clare Torry.

The Dark Side of the Moon fue un éxito inmediato, llegando en Estados Unidos a lo más alto de la lista Billboard 200 durante una semana. Permaneció en las listas 803 semanas (más de 15 años), siendo así el álbum que más tiempo ha permanecido en listas de la historia. Con una estimación de ventas de 50 millones de copias, es el álbum más exitoso de Pink Floyd y uno de los más vendidos a nivel mundial de la historia. Ha sido remasterizado y reeditado en dos ocasiones, además de haber sido versionado por varias bandas. Del álbum se extrajeron dos sencillos: «Money» y «Us and Them». Además de su éxito comercial, podría decirse que The Dark Side of the Moon es el álbum más popular entre los seguidores y críticos, y aparece frecuentemente en las listas de mejores álbumes de todos los tiempos.
wiki icon

Album Review
The official site for the umpteenth re-release of this old chestnut presents you with a daunting array of statistics that, if you're under the age of 30, will probably seem like the ravings of (appropriately enough) a lunatic. For if, by some freak circumstance (lost in Pacific jungle for thirty years/coma/just plain don't like lousy guitar bands etc.), you hold this CD in your hands for the first time, listen up: Dark Side Of The Moon spent an incredible ELEVEN CONSECUTIVE YEARS in the top 100 and has notched up a total of FOURTEEN YEARS lodged in the same place. That's a lot of Lear jets and football teams. But what new can be said?
Well, it now comes with an extra layer of new enhanced 5.1 surroundsound thingummy with (naturally) Dobly [sic]. And it's got a lovely new stained glass effect cover courtesy of Storm Thorgerson and his hilariously named Hipgnosis cohorts. And the music?
Contextually speaking this was the Floyd's saving grace. By 1972 they'd firmly claimed the avant garde (read: musically unadventurous but prone to hitting large gongs and setting fire to stuff onstage) art rock mainstream as their own playground. Yet these middle-class boys still craved, like, bread, man. After a prolonged period of fumbling soundtracks for European arthouse movies they'd finally emerged from under the shadow of founder/visionary/lost-marble icon, Syd Barrett with a coherently beautiful album, Meddle. Roger Waters had some big ideas about madness, life, death and all that deep stuff. EMI had a rather splendid studio with some top-notch engineers. Six months later...voila!
What made this concoction so popular at the time was a series of coincidences. The western world was now fully stereoed-up; the band hooked up with an immaculate engineer by the name of Alan Parsons (yes, that one with the project) and last, but not least, the band bothered to write some really fine songs. This was a long way from the half-baked nonsense that had plagued Ummagumma or Atom Heart Mother. Gilmour's guitar was now exquisitely tasteful (the heart still breaks over that little phrase about 36 seconds into ''Breathe'') and zen-like in what he could leave out (check the most underrated track ''Any Colour You Like''). The sound effects are as hackneyed as a 70s stereo demonstration record (that this album effectively replaced in most hi-fi stores at the time), yet the overall flow of the album still satisfies as it merges existential ballads (''Time'', ''Us And Them'') with cynical rockers (''Money'') and arena-impressing freak outs (''The Great Gig In The Sky'').
Too much scrutiny reveals a rhythm section that's laughably leaden, song structures that employ the same descending runs that appear on every Floyd album since Meddle (cf: ''Echoes'') and lyrics that embarrass with their sixth-form triteness. Yet how many writers will be saying the same of Radiohead's cosy attacks on globalisation and 21st century ennui on OK Computer (which owes such a huge amount to this album) in thirty years time? Ultimately it matters little. DSOTM is still a lovely record made brittle by overuse. One almost wishes that instead of spicing it up one more time, EMI had deleted it for a while to give us all room to breathe again...
wiki icon

User Comments

No comments yet...

Status
Locked icon unlocked


External Links
MusicBrainz Large icontransparent block Amazon Large icontransparent block Metacritic Large Icon